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Fossil Record A palaeontological open-access journal of the Museum für Naturkunde
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Volume 16, issue 2
Foss. Rec., 16, 217-227, 2013
https://doi.org/10.1002/mmng.201300011
© Author(s) 2013. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Foss. Rec., 16, 217-227, 2013
https://doi.org/10.1002/mmng.201300011
© Author(s) 2013. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  01 Aug 2013

01 Aug 2013

Ichneumonidae (Insecta: Hymenoptera) in Canadian Late Cretaceous amber

R. C. McKellar2,1, D. S. Kopylov3, and M. S. Engel1 R. C. McKellar et al.
  • 1Division of Entomology (Paleoentomology), Natural History Museum, and Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, 1501 Crestline Drive – Suite 140, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045, USA
  • 2Department of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, 1–26 Earth Sciences Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E3, Canada
  • 3Borissiak Paleontological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Profsoyuznaya ul. 123, Moscow, 117997, Russia

Abstract. Three new species and two new genera are described within the wasp family Ichneumonidae from Late Cretaceous (Campanian) amber collected at the Grassy Lake locality in Alberta, Canada. New taxa include Pareubaeus rasnitsyni n. gen. et sp. and P. incertus n. sp. within the subfamily Labenopimplinae, and Albertocryptus dossenus n. gen. et sp. within the subfamily Labeninae. The presence of a labenopimpline genus closely related to Eubaeus Townes within Canadian amber further supports faunal similarity between the Canadian assemblage and that recovered from Siberian amber. The records of Labeninae are the first from Mesozoic amber, and demonstrate that the subfamily was present in the Northern Hemisphere in the Late Cretaceous, as opposed to their modern, predominantly austral distribution.

doi:10.1002/mmng.201300011

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