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Fossil Record A palaeontological open-access journal of the Museum für Naturkunde
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Volume 21, issue 2
Foss. Rec., 21, 285-290, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/fr-21-285-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Foss. Rec., 21, 285-290, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/fr-21-285-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 23 Oct 2018

Research article | 23 Oct 2018

A giant mite in Cretaceous Burmese amber

Jason A. Dunlop1, Konrad Frahnert2, and Joanna Mąkol3 Jason A. Dunlop et al.
  • 1Museum für Naturkunde, Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity Science, Invalidenstrasse 43, 10115 Berlin, Germany
  • 2private address: Maxim-Gorki Str. 15a, 14513 Teltow, Germany
  • 3Department of Invertebrate Systematics and Ecology, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Kożuchowska 5B, 51-631 Wrocław, Poland

Abstract. An unusually large acariform mite is described as Immensmaris chewbaccei gen. et sp. nov. from the Cretaceous (ca. 100Ma) Burmese amber of Myanmar. With an idiosoma plus gnathosoma more than a centimetre long, it represents the largest unequivocal fossil mite ever recorded and approaches the maximum size of the largest living Acariformes today. Although some details of the dorsal idiosoma are equivocal, the new fossil appears to belong to Smarididae (Prostigmata: Parasitengona: Erythraeoidea) and also represents the largest erythraeoid mite ever discovered, indicating a clade of giant, possibly arboreal, mites in the Late Cretaceous of southeastern Asia.

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A new species of fossil mite, Immensmaris chewbaccei, is described from the 100 million-year-old (Cretcaeous) Burmese amber of Myanmar. It belongs to the modern family Smarididae and is of particular note for its enormous size, with a body length of about a centimetre. This makes it the largest example of an erythraeoid mite (the wider group to which it belongs), and in general it is one of the biggest mites ever to be recorded.
A new species of fossil mite, Immensmaris chewbaccei, is described from the 100 million-year-old...
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