Journal cover Journal topic
Fossil Record A palaeontological open-access journal of the Museum für Naturkunde
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 1.345 IF 1.345
  • IF 5-year value: 1.351 IF 5-year
    1.351
  • CiteScore value: 1.3 CiteScore
    1.3
  • SNIP value: 0.702 SNIP 0.702
  • SJR value: 0.442 SJR 0.442
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 17 Scimago H
    index 17
FR | Articles | Volume 21, issue 2
Foss. Rec., 21, 285-290, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/fr-21-285-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Foss. Rec., 21, 285-290, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/fr-21-285-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 23 Oct 2018

Research article | 23 Oct 2018

A giant mite in Cretaceous Burmese amber

Jason A. Dunlop et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 1,572 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
1,323 233 16 1,572 13 10
  • HTML: 1,323
  • PDF: 233
  • XML: 16
  • Total: 1,572
  • BibTeX: 13
  • EndNote: 10
Views and downloads (calculated since 23 Oct 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 23 Oct 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 1,395 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 1,367 with geography defined and 28 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 20 Jul 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
A new species of fossil mite, Immensmaris chewbaccei, is described from the 100 million-year-old (Cretcaeous) Burmese amber of Myanmar. It belongs to the modern family Smarididae and is of particular note for its enormous size, with a body length of about a centimetre. This makes it the largest example of an erythraeoid mite (the wider group to which it belongs), and in general it is one of the biggest mites ever to be recorded.
A new species of fossil mite, Immensmaris chewbaccei, is described from the 100 million-year-old...
Citation